Never trust a Time Machine made by a computer company Dec 31, 2020 In which Apple makes me very, very weary. ...
Using AST parsing for deriving IAM rules May 19, 2020 With enough metaprogramming, security can be fun. ...
That's not what the law says: the coronavirus regulations Apr 08, 2020 If you want a rule of law, maybe read the law? ...
Hart contracts, not smart contracts Feb 06, 2020 Why a philosophical argument shows the folly of Smart Contracts ...
The NHS Data Commandments and the memory hole Feb 04, 2020 Back in 2018, the British government published a document on the World Wide Web. This happens fairly often. In fact, they have a whole publishing platform for this. I started writing a post critiquing this document, as I felt it was a poorly considered idea. Before I got around to publishing it, the document disappeared from the Internet. Life went on. I was busy, and there are always many more blog post drafts that don’t ever get written or published. ...
Essential reading on the MIT Media Lab Sep 08, 2019 A peek inside the embattled Media Lab. ...
Making QR codes with cloud functions Jun 07, 2019 How to use Google's Cloud Functions to... cope with Google's deprecation of their own APIs. ...
Apple ID's two-factor and app-specific passwords leave a lot to be desired May 08, 2019 A grumpy discussion of why usable security matters. ...
Facebook Instant Articles: why hiding URLs hinders careful reading of media Apr 01, 2019 Free the URLs! They’re beautiful! ...
Instamuseums and the Tyranny of Engagement Metrics Sep 20, 2018 Pop-up “Instamuseums” are a thing, according to this video from Vox and this article by Sophie Haigney in The New Yorker: people will queue around the block and pay $40 for the privilege of taking photos of themselves alongside works of installation art specifically designed for social sharing at places like the Museum of Ice Cream in New York. I’ll spare you extensive thoughts on influencer culture, and instead say this: this kind of degradation of any actual discernible point to museums was an entirely predictable consequence of arts policy. ...