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Discussing software, the web, politics, sexuality and the unending supply of human stupidity.


storage


Towards an Evernote replacement

Since the recent announcements by Evernote that they really, really will be able to poke around inside your notebooks without issue, and they’ll also apply the same sort of machine learning technology to your data that people have convinced themselves that paying for a product will help them avoid, lots of people have been looking at alternatives to Evernote. I’ve been evaluating a few of them.

Here’s some of the open source alternatives I’ve seen people talk about:

  • Laverna, a client-side only JavaScript app that uses localStorage for your notes. No syncing, sadly.
  • Paperwork, PHP serverside app
  • Standard Notes, which aims to be an encrypted protocol for storing Evernote-style notes

These all handle the plain text (or Markdown or whatever) case reasonably well, but there’s a few things Evernote provides which we should be aware of if we’re trying to find replacements.

  1. text/plain or RTF storage. A lot of people store a lot of simple text notes in Evernote.
  2. OCRed PDF storage. Evernote has an app called Scannable that makes it ludicrously easy to scan a lot of documents and store them in Evernote.
  3. Web Clipper: I don’t use this, but a lot of people use Evernote as a kind of bookmarking service using the Web Clipper plugin that they provide. If they see a news article or recipe or whatever on the web, they clip it out and store it in Evernote and use that almost like a reading list, like what people use Instapaper/Pocket for etc.

The solutions people have been building generally solve problem (1) but do little to address problems (2) and (3).

My own preferred solutions are basically this: for (1), I’m leaning towards just storing and syncing together plain text Markdown files of some description.

Solving (2) is a harder problem. My current plan is to try and create a way to store all these in email. Email is a pretty reliable, well-tested and widely implemented Everything Bucket. The process would be relatively simple: scan document, run it through an OCR process, then provide the relevant title and tags which could be stored in the subject line and body of the email. The OCR result would also be stored in the body of the email to make it more easily searchable. Then you just stick it all in an email folder (or Gmail label). You’ve got a security layer (whatever your email provides, and if you are storing lots of important data in there, you should probably ensure it is 2FA). You’ve got sync (IMAP). You’ve got universal capture (email it to yourself). And you have already made either the financial bargain (with, say, Fastmail) or the give-away-all-your-personal-information bargain (Gmail). Backing up IMAP is relatively trivial compared to backing up whatever weird binary blob format people come up with.

Solving (3) is somebody else’s problem because I don’t understand why anyone wants to stick all the websites they’ve ever visited into Evernote.

That said, let’s not promise users replacement for software if we are only replicating the features from that software that we actually use. If anyone has great suggestions for how they are going to sort out problem (2), I’m all ears.