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LWS talk: Designing for the Web - Healthy practices for developers and designers

The following is contemporaneous notes from talk at London Web Standards by Matteo Pescarin (@ilPeach), development lead at Sainsbury’s (for now). There may be errors or material I missed.

“I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe”. I’ve seen developers and designers who didn’t want to touch a single line of HTML and CSS. I’ve seen fantastic designs that would work on paper. I’ve seen code that shouldn’t work in browsers.

There’s a lot to take in: learning the ever increasing complexity of front-end technologies.

At the beginning, we were very happy. Using tables to display data. Paginating millions of records. Then UX.

Then we started looking into content-first approaches. Personas, user journeys, interactions and behaviours, usability, cross-device compatibility, and many other aspects. A lot to take in.

Let’s say you don’t know web design. What is web design? Everything? Multi-faceted set of practices and doctrines that surround websites. Maybe it is more similar to product design. Quite difficult to grasp everything.

Semantic markup. Do you know?

  • What’s the difference between article and section?
  • How do you vertically align with CSS?

If developers have too much to take in, what should designers do? Learn to code?

The developers are masters in their field. Developers know the limits of the technologies. Designers know colour theory, typography, grid systems, use of whitespace etc. “Don’t expect to find the unicorn” - there are developers who learn design, and designers who learn to become developers, but they are rare.

Don’t expect tools to solve your problems: tools exist to help developers do design better. Things like SketchUp (and earlier Dreamweaver) enable designers to turn ideas into web pages. Developers have the same: CSS grid systems taught us indirectly how design work. Methodologies like Atomic Design too. But don’t let anybody decide which tools you should be using. Allow yourself to be flexible enough to experiment, try new things.

A better world is possible. We cannot shift responsibility.

1-10-100 rule: if you have to fix a problem during design time, cost is 1. Fix a problem during development time, cost is 10. Fix after delivery, cost is 100. Data-based analysis showed the 100 is more like 1m.

Iterate and validate: as developers and designers, we are biased. Involve your users. Design in the browser. Rapid prototyping. Use Design Sprints. Use style guides and pattern libraries - save thousands of hours in the long run.

Designers must sit with developers, to promote knowledge sharing. Work bottom-up, understand each other, elevate developers to work on front-end design.